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List of Privacy Focused E-mail Services

List of Privacy Focused E-mail Services

In our ongoing series of privacy-centric alternatives to common web services, today I’m going to discuss e-mail options.

You may think, “Why would I care if giant multinational corporations see that Walmart sent me a newsletter?” However, the issue isn’t necessarily with keeping your communications private.  For that, you would use something like Signal or Telegram using their “secret chat” feature.  Instead, it’s because this information is often sold to third party companies or governments.

Eventually, that box of chicken tendies you purchased every friday for the past 4 years is going to be taken into consideration by your health insurance from info they gleaned from user data.    

Private E-mail Services

Established Options:

ProtonMail

Price: Free option available

Features:

Protonmail Pricing

Notes:

Most people on the dissident right I see using a privacy based e-mail typically use ProtonMail.  Unfortunately, most usernames have already been taken so you’ll end up with [email protected]   It’s a good service though and you can pay by mail or crypto if you so choose.

HushMail

Price: $49.98 Annually (No free option available)

Features:

  • 10 GB storage
  • 2 secure web forms
  • Multiple layers of security
  • Ad-free
  • Unlimited e-mail aliases
  • Dedicated customer support

Notes:

HushMail is one of the original privacy focused e-mail services.  However, unlike ProtonMail they will give the government access to your account if they receive a warrant.

Tutanota

Pricing: Free option available

Features:

Tutanota Pricing

Notes:

Clean interface, well known, and they generally don’t log IP addresses.  However, according to their FAQ they will in the event of serious criminal allegations.

Mailfence

Pricing: Free option available

Features:

Mailfence Pricing

Notes:

Very feature rich with the option to send end-to-end encrypted messages with your own PGP key.  The interface is similar to ProtonMail (very clean).  They also after additional features for a monthly fee.

Zoho Mail

Pricing: No free option, but they have one with limited features for only $1 a month

Features:

Large suite of services and pricing plans

Notes:

While this service isn’t targeted at privacy minded folks, it was mentioned in the Snowden leaks as a service the government had trouble penetrating.  The Snowden leaks came out a long time ago though, so if they were dedicated to that goal I wouldn’t be so confident these days.

Lesser Known Options:

CounterMail

Pricing: No free option available

Notes:

“Each email is uniquely encrypted before it leaves your computer. A CounterMail account lets you communicate in security with any other OpenPGP-compatible email user anywhere in the world. You can see how it works here. There is no known method which will allow a person or group to break OpenPGP’s encryption by cryptographic or computational means.”

Criptext

Pricing: Free

Notes:

New kids on the block.  They appear be trying to innovate in the “private e-mail” category.  Take a look at their “about” page, it has some interesting historical information about the owners.

Disroot

Pricing: Free option available

Notes:

Disroot is a suite of privacy focused apps offering such things as instant messaging, document editing, e-mail, cloud storage & a paste-bin.

POSTEO

Pricing: $1 per month

Notes:

Solid option for eco nationalists since they promote the fact that their servers run on green energy.

Librem Mail

Pricing: No free option available, starts at $7.99 / month

Notes:

Another service offering a bundle of privacy focused apps.  Looks like most of them cost money other than their basic mail & chat options.

Runbox

Pricing: No free option available, starts at $1.66 / month

Notes:

Services targeted toward businesses that have a need to communicate securely.

Scryptmail (Discontinued)

I’m just adding this one here as an example. They recently announced they’re discontinuing services, which is common for startups.  That’s why I would recommend using an established brand or rolling your own mail server.

Self Hosted Options:

If you’re tech savvy you can always manage your own e-mail server.  It use to be difficult to setup & secure your own server but these days you can run scripts that will setup everything for you.  Either grab yourself a Raspberry Pi and install it on there, or get a virtual machine at a place like Digital Ocean.  In a future post I’ll go through step by step how to do all of this, for now you can fine plenty others with a Google search.

iRedMail

Mail-In-A-Box

Final recommendation:

ProtonMail